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Astronomical Observations

Here are some of my recent observations made with the Astronomical Society of Kansas City's 30" F4.5 Newtonian Reflector at Powell Observatory in Louisburg, KS. You will find I am mostly interested in observing galaxies. Right now it's Arp Galaxies and the second Herschel 400. I also observe occasionally with a 13" F4.5 Odyssey and a homemade 10" F5. For planets and the moon I frequently use my C90. When I do astrophotography I use my LX200 10" and shot piggyback with a telephoto 210mm or through the C90. It doesn't matter what kind of scope you use, there's lots to see on "ANY CLEAR NIGHT". Get out there with your telescope, observe, and draw them!


The photos shown with the observing notes below are actually downloaded from The STScl Digitized Sky Survey and are not ones I took unless so designated. The name of the object is followed by its magnitude estimate, size, description and RA and DEC coordinates.


Arp 90 NGC 5929 13.6 1.0' X 0.9' SAB(s)bc I-II 15h26m06s +41d40m
Arp 90 NGC 5930 12.2 1.7' X 0.9' Sab: pec 15h26m07s +41d40m

UTC 0336 090497 Powell Obs.

Located object with 40mm looks like two overlapping footballs centered between two field stars. Each galaxy twice as long as wide with central condensation and fuzzy edges. Appear almost equally bright.

Image coutesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp91 NGC 5953 12.1 1.6' X 1.4' SAa: pec 15h34m32s +15d11m
Arp91 NGC 5954 12.1 1.3' X 0.6' SAB(rs)cd pec 15h34m34s +15d12m

UTC 0255 90497 Powell Obs.

Located object with 40mm very obvious. Shaped like a backwards L. Dense and crisp edges. Better with the 40mm. The companion is obvious. Several others, David Pratt, Perry Brandt, Don Zurliene. Observed.

Image courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

220 IC 4553 13.1 1.5' X 1.2' S? 15h34m57s +23d30m
Arp220 IC 4554 13.1 1.8' S? 15h34m57s +23d30m
Arp220 IC 1127 15h34m57s +23d30m

UTC 0220 090497 Powell Obs.

Located object with 40mm very faint, looks like an elliptical almost with slight condensation in the core. The separate nuclei were not resolvable. The companion is obvious. Several others, John Anderson, David Pratt, Perry Brandt, Don Zurliene. Observed.

Image courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

72 NGC 5994 14.2 0.4' X0.2' SB? 15h46m53s +17d52m
Arp72 NGC 5996 12.8 1.8' X 0.9' S? 15h46m58s +17d53m

UTC 0154 090497 Powell Obs.

Located object with 40mm very faint, but oval shape is apparent. Need to boost power with 20mm. Not sure I am seeing it now. Better with the 40mm. The companion is obvious. Several others, John Anderson, David Pratt, Perry Brandt, Don Zurliene. Observed.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp324 UGC 10143C 15.5 0.8' X 0.5' Spiral 16h02m08s +15d53m
Arp324 15.3 16h02m10s +15d54m
Arp324 UGC 10143 15.2 E3 16h02m12s +15d54m
Arp324 UGC 10143B 15.1 0.6' X 0.4' SAB(r)ab 16h02m13s +15d56m
Arp324 1.7' X 1.0' 16h02m15s +15d56m
Arp324 UGC 10143A 14.2 E+ 16h02m17s +15d58m

UTC 0340 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm just on the limits of visibility. Could make out four, maybe five of the more condensed members, looked like ellipticals, maybe nuclei of spirals.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

122 NGC 6040B 14.9 0.8' SA0+ pec 16h04m26s +17d44m
Arp122 NGC 6040A 13.6 1.4' X 0.5' SAB(s)c 16h04m26s +17d45m

UTC 0350 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm very ephemeral, coming in and out as averted vision. One condensed like an elliptical and the other a streak with some s-shaped curvature. Bright field star opposite two dimmer stars frame this pair.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digital Sky Survey.

Arp209 NGC 6052 13.0 0.9' X 0.7' Sc 16h05m12s +20d32m

UTC 0410 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm A dim fan shaped flare midway between two dissimilar magnitude field stars. Not very large but somewhat elongated at an angle to the line connecting the two stars.

Image courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp185 NGC 6217 11.2 3.0' X 2.5' (R)SB(rs)bc 16h32m40s +78d11m

UTC 0314 090497 Powell Obs.

Located object with 40mm very clear and defined with two arms of bar easy to resolve. Several others, David Pratt, Perry Brandt, Don Zurliene also observed.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp73 IC 1222 13.5 1.7' X 1.4' SXS5 16h35m08s +46d12m

UTC 0415 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm S shaped cloud next to a pentagram of stars. Hard to see distinctly, must avert vision and then it pops out.

Image courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp293 NGC 6285 13.5 1.3' X 0.7' S0+? pec 16h58m23s +58d57m
Arp293 NGC 6286 13.3 1.3' X 1.2' Sb: pec 16h58m31s +58d56m

UTC 0505 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm Edge on fairly distinct with patch nearby which could be a spiral. Forms a triangle with two field stars.

Image courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp38 NGC 6412 11.7 2.5' X 2.2' SAS5 17h29m36s +75d42m

UTC 0520 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm at the end of a string of three stars situated between the end star and a small trio of dim field stars. A face on spiral with slightly brighter center. Circular and uniform.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.



Arp81 NGC 6621 12.8 2.1' X 0.8' Sb: pec 18h12m54s +68d21m
Arp81 NGC 6622 15.3 0.5' X 0.4' 18h13m00s +68d21m

UTC 0530 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm Like the smile of the Cheshire Cat…a curved streak of milkiness next to a branch of three stars and when you look right at it, it disappears and then when you look slightly away it smiles back at you. No real structure obvious just the ).

Photo courtesy of the STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp29 NGC 6946 8.8 11.6' X 9.9' SAB(rs)cd 20h34m52s +60d09m

UTC 0350 090497 Powell Obs.

Located objects with 40mm Very diffuse and hard to resolve all detail. Nucleus obvious and two arms.

Image courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey.

Arp169 NGC 7236 13.0 0.7' X 0.7' SA0- 22h14m45s +13d50m
169 NGC 7237 13.6 0.7' X 0.7' SA0- 22h14m46s +13d50m

UTC 0600 090497 Powell Observatory

Located objects with 40mm Two starlike patches cradled in the middle of a triangle of stars. No distinct structure.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey

Arp226 NGC 7252 11.4 2.0' X 1.6' SAB0^0? pec 22h20m44s -24d40m

UTC 0629 090497 Powell Observatory

With 40 mm appears as a bright core with tight filamentous swirls wrapped tightly around it, like an orange wrapped in celaphane. Core as bright as neighboring field stars.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey

Arp93 NGC 7284 11.9 2.1' X 1.5' SB(s)0^0 pec 22h28m36s -24d50m
Arp93 NGC 7285 11.9 2.4' X 1.4' SB(rs)a pec 22h28m38s -24d50m

UTC 0638 090497 Powell Observatory

With 40 mm appears as two eyes peering out of the darkness with no nearby stars. One eye appears to have a wispy eyebrow. Very dense nuclei in each of the two galaxies.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey

Arp 14 NGC 7314 10.9 4.6' X 2.1' SAB(rs)c: II 22h35m45s -26d03m

UTC 0645 090497 Powell Observatory

With 40 mm looks like a spray of snow coming off the plow of the wedge of stars that points to it. About five times as long as wide and uniformly bright.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey

Arp319 NGC 7317 13.6 1.1' X 1.1'? E4 22h35m51s +33d56m
Arp319 NGC 7318A 13.4 0.9' E2 pec 22h35m56s +33d57m
Arp319 NGC 7318B 13.4 1.9' X 1.2 E2 22h35m58s +33d57m
Arp319 NGC 7319 13.1 1.7' X 1.3' SB(s)bc pec 22h36m03s +33d58m
Arp319 NGC 7320 12.6 2.2' X 1.1' SA(s)d 22h36m04s +33d56m

UTC 0710 090497 Powell Observatory

First I found NGC 7331, a bright 8.8 magnitude edge on galaxy surrounded by elipticals. Using this a reference, I moved over to Stephens Quintet. The familiar little cluster of cotton balls glided into view in its rich little star field. As usual, first two balls were visible, then three and four. The fifth is always elusive, but it eventually came in. I guess it's because it has no bright core like its comrades. Almost soulless.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey

Arp222 NGC 7727 10.6 4.7' X 3.6' SAB:(s?)0/a p 23h39m54s -12d17m

UTC 0903 090497 Powell Observatory

Bright nucleus surrounded by whirlpool like strands of gas.

Photo courtesy of STScl Digitized Sky Survey


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